Apple buys small machine learning company Tuplejump, report says

Apple buys small machine learning company, report says

  • Silicon Valleys tech companies in recent years have unveiled moonshot initiatives they claim will someday “cure” diseases like cancer.
  • In response, many companies have called for “blind hiring” that removes names and headshots from r�sum�s.
  • The brand currently appeals to a demographic that is over 35, but we want to start getting younger people to wear these shoes,” Rishwain tells Fast Company .
  • The company reintroduced its test in October of 2015 , which included fewer health reports and ancestry information for a higher price tag of $199.
  • Fast Company & Inc © Mansueto Ventures, LLC


Apple isn’t confirming it, but a TechCrunch report says Apple has acquired a small U.S./Indian machine learning co

@FastCompany: Apple buys small machine learning company, report says

Apple isn’t confirming it, but a TechCrunch report says Apple has acquired a small U.S./Indian machine learning company called Tuplejump. No deal terms were reported. The Tuplejump website has been taken down. 

Tuplejump described itself in simple terms as a startup that uses machine learning to help big companies make sense of messy big data. If the acquisition did take place, it would be Apple’s third machine learning buy in the last year. It bought Perceptio in October 2015, then Turi in August. 

With the little we know about Tuplejump, it’s difficult to say how Apple might apply the technology to current or existing products. But it’s safe to say that many future Apple products will apply machine learning.  MS

Recruitment and hiring platform Jopwell is kicking off a “national headshot tour” tomorrow that will go to colleges in Los Angeles, Boston, New York, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, and Atlanta, offering free professional headshots to underrepresented ethnic minority students.

Sixty percent of employers use social media platforms like LinkedIn to research job candidates, and good profile pictures can boost a person’s chances of getting interviewed by 40%. 

Many studies have shown that candidates with white-sounding names get more callbacks than those with African-American-sounding names. In response, many companies have called for “blind hiring” that removes names and headshots from résumés. 

Porter Braswell, Jopwell’s CEO and cofounder, points out that many companies find it hard to implement “blind hiring” because it would mean fundamentally changing their hiring methods. Moreover, some applicants might want to express their ethnicity and race because they want to bring their authentic selves to work. 

Connie Rishwain, a veteran shoe executive who spent the last 20 years at UGG, is now the president of Vionic.

Vionic is a decade-old company that was launched by a podiatrist interested in creating shoes with orthotic support. New president Rishwain’s role is to help the brand reach a wider audience and become known for trendy but comfortable shoes. Vionic’s designers have already been working on fashionable shoes, from leopard-print flats to booties. “The brand currently appeals to a demographic that is over 35, but we want to start getting younger people to wear these shoes,” Rishwain tells Fast Company. 

Rishwain says the brand has grown tremendously over the last two years, going from $78 million in revenue to $150 million. One of her goals is to develop a smart distribution strategy, ensuring that the shoes are sold at retailers with good reputations, such as Nordstrom and Zappos. She believes that this was crucial to the success of UGG and would work well for Vionic as well.  ES

When it comes to diseases like cancer, much can be read into the language we use. For instance, there’s a great deal of debate about whether military terminology like “battling” cancer are useful, or suggest that the disease is a fight that only the strongest can win. 

Likewise, Silicon Valley’s tech companies in recent years have unveiled moonshot initiatives they claim will someday “cure” diseases like cancer. When announcing a $3 billion investment into life sciences research, Mark Zuckerberg described his goal to cure the disease within his daughter’s lifetime. 

We’ve been using such terminology for decades, but is it helpful? Cancer is a particularly tricky one: It fools the immune system—and the drugs we have developed to treat it—by mutating rapidly. It’s extremely difficult to cure, so some medical experts opt to use terms like “better managing” cancer when discussing our future prospects. Others say we’re at a point where we can use terms like cure, in part due to advancements in novel immunotherapy treatments.

That announcement was met with plenty of enthusiasm — $3 billion is certainly enough to grab headlines — but it also caused some to wonder whether it would be enough to make a dent. As NBC’s Maggie Fox reminds us: 

• The NIH has a 2016 annual budget of $32 billion for scientific research.

• The CDC’s annual budget is $7 billion, and much of it is spent on prevention of common diseases. 

But as Stephen Downs from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation tells me, it’s not just about money. “What’s most important is the mentality,” he says. “It’s about bringing in new ways of thinking, different paradigms, and in some cases breaking out of some of the sector’s established traditions.”

Yahoo has confirmed a Recode report from early this morning acknowledging that at least 500 million users’ accounts have been compromised by what it thinks is a “state-sponsored” hacker.

The company admitted that “a copy of certain user account information—including names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords, and, in some cases, encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers—was stolen from the company’s network in late 2014 by what it believes is a state-sponsored actor,” according to the Wall Street Journal.

Yahoo plans on alerting those affected by the hack, and is helping to secure their accounts, the Journal wrote.

Verizon, which won the bidding process to acquire Yahoo for $4.8 billion in July, learned of the hack within the last two days. “We understand that Yahoo is conducting an active investigation of this matter, but we otherwise have limited information and understanding of the impact,” the company said in a statement. “We will evaluate as the investigation continues through the lens of overall Verizon interests.” DT

The earliest customers of 23andMe’s at-home DNA tests will remember a time when it cost just $99 to get a full set of health and ancestral reports. But that all changed after an regulatory crackdown in 2013 (the U.S. Food and Drug Administration was concerned that consumers would misinterpret the results and opt for unnecessary tests and procedures). The company reintroduced its test in October of 2015, which included fewer health reports and ancestry information for a higher price tag of $199. 

Now, the company is back to offering a $99 version for those that are solely interested in ancestral and family information. That offering includes access to a tool that matches customers up with close or distant relatives. CF

You can buy it for a mere $195,000 at Moments In Time, a site that lists sales of rare signed documents. Jobs is said to have kept the certificate on his wall at Apple from the time he got it to the time of his ouster in 1985. At that time, new CEO John Skulley ordered Jobs’s office be cleaned out and the contents thrown away, but a resourceful (and nameless) employee saved the certificate. 

The sellers point out that Jobs memorabilia with his signature is hard to find. One batch of documents, including the dissolution letter to Apple cofounder Ronald Wayne, sold at Sotheby’s for $1.5 million in 2011. 

The short version: After a California attorney sued her client over a negative Yelp review, the review was found to be defamatory. But in an unusual move, a court ordered Yelp itself to remove the review. That ruling tests the limits of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which prevents online platforms from behind held liable for most content posted by users.

As Ars Technica reported today, Yelp is fighting the ruling and the California Supreme Court agreed to hear the case, though it didn’t say when. The stakes are pretty high. This might be a state court battle, but a loss for Yelp would send a clear message that tech platforms can’t simply throw up their hands and claim legal immunity when the content they host is legally questionable.   

Macy’s and on-demand stylist brand BeGlammed are now partners. Customers can go to the Macy’s website to book appointments for a hairstylist or makeup artist to come to their homes. The collaboration allows Macy’s to strengthen its reputation as a brand customers can turn to for their beauty needs, adding to its thriving beauty counter business. Meanwhile, BeGlammed will be able to leverage Macy’s name recognition and wide audience.  ES

Apple buys small machine learning company Tuplejump, report says

You might also like More from author

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.